Session Descriptions

2016 Excellence in Building Conference & EXPO

September 27-29, 2016
Dallas Frisco Embassy Suites, Frisco, TX

Conference Sessions

The following are the session descriptions for the 2016 Excellence in Building Conference & EXPO:

 


41 Million IQ Points Lost...Why Chemicals in Buildings Matter

Day 3 - 8:40 AM-9:40 AM

Presenter: Dr. Jules Elkins 

Each year, hundreds of chemicals are found in Americans of all ages, including lead, mercury, dioxins and PCBs. Studies have detected endocrine disrupting chemicals present in building products in cord blood, breast milk, and children’s urine. PBDEs, or flame retardants, which can have negative impacts on learning and memory, show up in upholstery, mattresses, and electronics, and leach out into household air and dust. Levels of PBDEs found in California kids are higher than levels in adults working in the polyurethane industry. Arsenic is widely used as a wood preservative, and one swab from 4-­--year-­--old’s hand typically far exceeds what EPA allows in a glass of water under the Safe Drinking Water Act standard. Many modern building materials contain hazardous chemicals. Some are respiratory stressors, neurotoxins, hormone mimics, carcinogens, reproductive hazards, or developmental toxins. These chemicals are found in our buildings and they are found in our bodies. One thing most of these chemicals have in common is that their toxicity is unknown. The EPA is widely considered inadequate at safeguarding human health: the thousands of chemicals we are exposed to in our buildings have undergone little to no toxicity testing and their potential health dangers are generally unknown. In fact, since 1976 when the Toxic Substances Control Act was passed, only 5 chemicals have been banned, and this does not even include asbestos. Consider, also, that Americans typically spend about 90 percent of their time indoors, where pollutant levels are often more than ten times higher than those outside. The indoor environment is a topic of increasing concern to environmental health professionals, homeowners, and commercial building tenants, and green building standards do not adequately address this concern. This presentation discusses these contemporary, and often controversial, issues in building. It focuses on why healthy buildings matter to your family, your business, and your community. We will discuss the chemicals of concern, how these differ from current green building standards, and practical strategies to avoid them in the building process. The learning objectives address the following: 1) The worst-­--in-­--class chemicals: what are they? 2) Why do they matter, and do your clients care? 3) Evaluate the health impact of different building techniques, including construction and design. 4) Practical, cost-­--effective strategies for eliminating these chemicals.

Learning Objectives:

1) By the end of the presentation, participants will be able to identify the worst-­-- in-­--class chemicals, know where they are found in building materials, and will be able to assess whether and why these chemicals matter to human health. (2) Participants will be better able to evaluate the health impact of different building techniques, including construction and design. (3) Participants will learn practical, cost-­--effective strategies and tools for eliminating or reducing these chemicals from their building process. (4) Participants will learn why this matters.

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A Breath of (Measurable) Fresh Air: An IAQ Scoring Tool

Day 1 - 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

Presenter: Iain Walker 

Healthy indoor environments are valued by homeowners and buyers but there is currently no way to effectively indicate or value the IAQ performance of a home. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Building America are helping to solve this problem by developing an IAQ score – an asset rating similar to existing ratings for energy use. Ratings will be based on observable and measurable quantities assessed by inspection and diagnostic tests. This session will present an outline of the score and a summary of the attributes of the home included in the rating. Comments and questions to help shape future development of the score are welcome.

Learning Objectives:

Understand opportunities and issues associated with valuing IAQ performance, related to high performance homes Compare rating systems and scoring tools, as they related to IAQ performance and high performance homes Compare different methods to evaluate IAQ in homes Discuss the components of a new IAQ scoring tool and Summarize the attributes of the home included in the rating.

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A Case Study Analysis Of ICF Mid-Rise Multi-Family Construction

Day 2 - 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

Presenter: Cameron Ware 

This presentation explores the use of Insulating Concrete Form (ICF), technology for the construction of multi-family projects of up to 5 stories. The components and features of ICF systems, basics of installation, integration of other trades and acceptance by codes will be discussed. We will provide a case study analysis of the following significant ICF projects (most are mid-rise multi-family projects located in the state of Texas): * Schofield NBC Barracks * Angelo State University Dormitories * Hilton Garden Inn Hotel * Holiday Inn Express Hotel * Spring Hill Suites Hotel * Trinity United Methodist Church * Weatherford College Each case study will cover: * Construction Highlights * Integration with other critical building materials and systems * Challenges Faced And Lessons Learned * Building Performance Assessment/3rd Party verifications * Budgets and Costs * Commentary from designers and developers involved

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Adopting Energy Codes in "Home Rule States"

Day 1 - 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

Presenter: Richard Morgan 

“Home Rule States” are those where responsibility for adopting and enforcing energy and other building codes falls to cities and counties. In Texas and Oklahoma, the state officially adopts the state energy code but each city also has to adopt by local ordinance and enforce that code. SPEER has developed strategies and tools to encourage local adoption and to make it as quick and easy for cities and the industry as possible. This session will review barriers to local adoption and some of the tools in the SPEER Energy Code Adoption Toolkit to overcome these barriers.

Learning Objectives:

Understand the dynamics of code adoption in home rule states, Identify common barriers to code adoption, Understand the strategies SPEER has developed to overcome code adoption barriers Become familiar with the tools developed specifically for the Texas 2015 Energy Code Adoption.

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All Things are NOT Created Equal: Comparing Multifamily & Single Family Strategies & Impacts

Day 2 - 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

Presenter: Aaron Gary 

A panel will discuss multi-family apartments and single-family homes and compare the relative impact of different energy efficiency and green building practices. Topics will include, how energy efficiency measures differ in impact, what's different about ventilation strategies and different benefits and impacts to air-sealing.

Learning Objectives:

• Compare differences in construction techniques between these two similar use types • Look at Commercial (e.g. ASHRAE 90.1) and HERS based modeling impacts • Understand why and how ventilation requirements and strategies differ • Review various above code programs and how they apply (LEED, NGBS, ENERGY STAR)

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An Emerging Idea: An Energy Code Appropriate for Multifamily Buildings

Day 2 - 2:15 AM-3:15 AM

Presenter: Nehemiah Stone 

Multifamily buildings are not purely “residential” or “nonresidential” in nature. Although they are home to nearly a third of the population, they are usually commercial properties with renter households. After several rounds of code updates attempting to shoehorn them into codes developed for other building types, the California utilities are now supporting efforts to design codes (both California’s and the IECC) specifically for multifamily buildings.

Learning Objectives:

1. Learn how codes that apply to multifamily buildings have been developed over the years. 2. Find out about code elements that are misaligned with multifamily buildings, because they were originally developed for single-family homes or commercial buildings. 3. Learn about what problems this has caused for the design and enforcement communities. 4. Learn about what is happening to try to correct the situation in the IECC and in California’s Building Energy Efficiency Standards (Title 24).

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Applying the Seven Strategies for Changing Behavior to Selling Zero

Day 2 - 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

Presenter: Sam Rashkin 

There are seven tried-and-true principals for changing behavior, yet it’s surprising how often we neglect them for promoting high-performance buildings. The Zero Energy Ready Home Program has rigorously applied all seven to push a very heavy rock up a very steep hill. Learn the critical value proposition for this important new label and how to effectively promote it to the housing industry with these seven strategies.

Learning Objectives:

List the seven common strategies for changing basic behavior • Discuss how these strategies can be applied to changing behavior and attitudes toward Zero Energy Ready Homes • Demonstrate how to effectively promote the value proposition for this new label • Understand available tools to communicate about zero energy ready homes

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Better Buildings Homes Challenge Finds Moisture in Commonly Built Homes

Day 2 - 2:15 AM-3:15 AM

Presenters: Brian Lieburn  Gary Parsons 

Dow’s Building Better Homes Challenge is a multi-home, 5-year research project partnership between Dow Building Solutions and Cobblestone Homes to investigate the performance of building enclosures designed to meet and exceed energy code requirements. Twelve case study single family research houses were constructed in Midland, MI (CZ%) with four building energy efficiency strategies. Data will be presented on the cost to build, energy use and hygrothermal performance of various strategies. Bi-annual occupant surveys provide a qualitative insight to the value of High Performance Homes.

Learning Objectives:

1. Understand how different wall insulation and air sealing strategies used to meet increasing energy codes actually perform in 12 case study homes from a moisture and energy perspective. 2. Understand actual cost to build to various energy codes 3. Understand the impact of occupant behavior on hygrothermal performance 4. Understand occupant perception of energy use and comfort in high performance homes.

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Better Buildings, Better Sales, Better Business

Day 3 - 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Presenter: Todd Gamboa 

Education is the key to change, but sales drive the decisions. Learn how to convert your builder clientsto high performance leveraging education, motivation, and designation. Historically, HERS Raters and performance contractors have been coming through the back door when working with builders. In today’s market, working through a builder's superintendent or purchasing manager isn't enough. The key to becoming part of the builder’s process and product is educating the people who sell the homes...the Sales Team. Converting the Sales and Marketing Team is the best way to demonstrate real value to customers. Demonstrating how to SELL high performance homes throughout your market gives you access through the front door! 

Learning Objectives:

1. Implement architectural details into plans to illustrate improved performance at connection points, air barriers, and building envelopes. 2. Understand the designs which incorporate better HVAC systems in houses. 3. Incorporate “House as a System” thinking into your blueprints. 4. Learn how to be a resource to your existing customer as a high performance homes specialist and drive them towards NetZero designs. 5. Leverage building science knowledge and details to sell your plans to builders and potential clients.

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Beyond. High Performance

Day 1 - 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

Presenter: Brad Townsend 

Affordable Solutions for tomorow's (and today's) High Performance Buildings.

Learning Objectives:

1. Relationships that create Real High Performance and Real Value for the Builder and Consumer.

2. Improving Energy Performance while Imporving Structural Performance.

3. The High Performance Home and the Indoor Environment.

4. The Goal - Affordability & Value - How we get there.

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Building High Performance Homes Quickly and Cost Effectively

Day 1 - 9:30 AM-10:30 AM

Presenter: Scott Sanders 

Build to 2015 IECC for $50/SF! Just kidding, that's not happening but you should still check out this session to learn how one company is speculatively building new Zero Energy Ready homes cost competitively and in about 100 calendar days.

Learning Objectives:

Attendees will learn about using off the shelf materials to achieve exceptional energy efficiency. Participants will engage in in a discussion on the cost to benefit trade off of increasing energy efficiency. Attendees will learn about the line by line cost details of building high peerformance new construction homes. Participants will gain an increased understanding of specifications and processes in hitting high performance targets.

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Building the Homes of the Future Now

Day 3 - 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Presenter: Anthony Aebi 

Show my strategy and examples of how to build Homes of the Future NOW. How to build those homes implementing my strategies and that there is always room for improvement and learning something new.

Learning Objectives:

How to build an air tight structure. Show the importance of building structures that can last thousands of years and survive almost any natural disaster. Show the importance of getting a building HERS score as low as possible before adding renewables. How to keep it simple.

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Clearing the Air: Ventilation

Day 2 - 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

Presenter: Paul Wlodkowski 

Two performance levels will be explored - 1) ICF Basic 2) ICF Enhanced Performance

Learning Objectives:

Summarize the importance of a whole-house ventilation system • Understand why low infiltration impacts ventilation needs • Measure air flow of whole-house ventilation systems • List the five RESNET-approved tools for calculating the air flow of whole-house ventilation systems

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Close the Door on Hazardous Chemicals in Building Products

Day 3 - 9:50 AM-10:50 AM

Presenter: Lauren Asplen 

A home’s walls could be making occupants sick. Insulation can be the hidden trigger for health problems. Learn about hazardous insulation  and safer choices.

Learning Objectives:

Learn major types of insulation. Understand the health impact of poor indoor air quality. Identify potential hazardous chemicals in insulation. Assess healthier insulation alternatives.

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Collaboration for Success, How a Builder-Rater Partnership Can Help Builders to Proactively Avoid Problems

Home builders and Home Energy Raters work together regularly to ensure minimum requirements are met for homes built to code standards, for utility incentive programs, or to receive national energy efficiency programs certifications for programs such as LEED and ENERGY STAR. The role of the Rater can range from the basics necessary for compliance to a more collaborative and interactive role with the builder’s design team, construction staff, and sales representatives. The more in depth relationship is one that makes it possible for a home builder and their trade contractors to avoid common problems that negatively impact the energy efficiency, durable, and comfort of a home. This panel of Raters and home builders will share examples of how they collaborate regularly to proactively avoid problems and build higher quality homes.

Learning Objectives:

• Learn the various ways that Raters and home builders can work together to avoid problems in the field • Understand what some of the most common problems are that Raters and builders are faced with when building energy efficient homes • Learn the Rater’s perspective on how builders can best manage problems • Learn the Builders’ perspective on how Raters can best assist with the management of problems

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Drain Water Heat Recovery (DWHR) -Energy Efficient Installations Earning LEED & HERS points

Day 3 - 11:00 AM-12:00 PM

Presenter: Rod Buchalter 

This session will review drain water heat recovery ( DWHR) concepts and focus on the 3 different types of installations. Installation method can vary the potential energy savings. This now appears to be more evident in Southern California with recent findings.

Learning Objectives:

1. The definition of drain water heat recovery ( DWHR) 2. 3 types of DWHR installations 3. Why equal flow installation yields the most energy savings / HERS credit 4. New findings in Southern California to support equal flow installations.

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Durability, Resilience and Energy Efficiency: Working Together to Make Sustainable Buildings

Day 2 - 2:15 AM-3:15 AM

Presenter: Theresa Weston 

As building, energy and green codes become more stringent, new building technologies and innovations are being incorporated into the building envelope. When incorporating new technologies into building assemblies traditional construction practices need to be adapted. However, as these adaptations of construction practices take place they still need to maintain adherence to basic principles of water management to prevent moisture accumulation in building assemblies. This presentation will describe some of the water management challenges and choices that arise when increasing the thermal performance of building. The presentation will include a review of the progress of industry standard practice and guideline development on the development of details to maintain air, water and thermal barrier continuity and integrity..

Learning Objectives:

Understand basic building science principles of air, water and thermal management as they pertain to wall systems -Understand the key material properties which must be assessed when designing wall systems with increased thermal performance -Review the progress in the development of industry standards and guidelines for detailing highly insulated wall assemblies.

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Enclosed Attic Considerations: The Science Behind the Alternatives

Day 2 - 9:15 AM-10:15 AM

Presenter: Liang Gwee 

Building codes and performance expectations are accelerating. During this interactive session, we’ll explore your attic insulation considerations, in particular, your unvented attic options for the upcoming code cycle and current high performance home specifications

Learning Objectives:

1. Understand the upcoming changes in Building Codes for Unvented Attics. 2. Gain an appreciation for the building science considerations of each option. 3. Learn the pro’s and con’s of the options for different climate zones. 4. Evaluate the constructability and performance implications of each option.

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Energy Demand Management: Why it is Time to Look Beyond Energy Efficiency.

Day 2 - 10:30 AM-11:30 AM

Presenter: Greg Cobb 

Utilities are juggling three competing requirements: (1) supply the growing energy demands of their residential customers - including new housing stock, (2) meet regulatory requirements to increase adoption of renewable and distributed energy sources and (3) adapt to rapidly changing regulatory and political pressure to reduce or eliminate use of nuclear, coal and even natural gas power plants. Low HERS homes have slowed off-peak energy demand, but peak demand is still growing. The building science community can help utilities address these challenges by moving beyond energy efficiency to energy demand management. Energy demand management uses technology to shift the time energy is consumed by a home to flatten the daily demand curve. A flatter demand curve improves utility profitability and delays the date utilities must invest in conventional generation capacity. With more time and capital, utilities are better able to implement a transition to renewable energy sources. By aligning the timing of home energy demand with renewable generation, energy demand management also enables greater adoption of intermittent renewable technologies. This session will provide strategies and best practices for home builders to implement energy demand management features in the homes they sell.

Learning Objectives:

• Impact of energy efficiency and intermittent renewable energy sources on timing of utility energy demand • Factors driving coming changes in utility rate, rebate and incentive programs to influence consumer’s timing of energy consumption • Overview of energy demand management technologies and strategies that shift energy demand timing • Recommendations of energy demand management solutions builders should be prepared to deploy now to align with the coming utility changes • How builders can market homes with energy demand management to increase sales and margins.

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Energy Innovation in Residential Building Enclosures

Day 3 - 7:30 AM-8:30 AM

Presenter: Steve Bostic 

Seven Guiding Principles of “An Energy Innovation System ” Insulsteel’s High Performance EcoShell Building Enclosure™ client design outcomes focus on meeting and exceeding national performance standards established by the DOE Zero Energy Ready Homes; USGBC LEED Platinum; and US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards for Indoor Air Quality, WaterSense® and Energy Star®. The EcoShell Building technology incorporates seven guiding principles: 1. The EcoShell EPS Insulated Exterior Wall, Roof Panels and Foundation System Reducing residential energy cost to “$ zero” starts with the Insulsteel EcoShell building enclosure system that achieves R40 equivalent insulation and minimizes air infiltration and thermal bridging throughout the structure. EcoShell technology contributes significantly to achieving USGBC LEED Platinum and DOE ZERH designations. 2. Heating, Cooling & Ventilation Integrating mechanical system inverter technology allows the HVAC system to modulate the power from 10% to 130% insuring that the compressor rarely goes through on/off cycles. The inverter technology units are rated by AHRI up to 18-20 SEER. 3. Healthy Indoor Air EcoShell’s InsulAIR system improves indoor air quality an essential element in healthy livability of modern-day homes. The EcoShell integrates micro filtration; fresh air exchange and UV light filtration technologies to achieve EPA Indoor airPLUS certification. 4. Renewable Energy Efficient utilization of solar photovoltaic and roof-mounted systems are designed and used to achieve a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) score of 0. 5. Water Efficiency Water saving systems reduces the cost of home ownership, environmentally and monetarily to achieve EPA WaterSense certification. Optional cisterns provide a recycling method for free rainwater to irrigate exterior plants, grass, trees and gardens. 6. Land Fill Waste The EcoShell is extremely environmentally friendly and landfill cost and waste is virtually a thing of the past. 7. Lithium-Ion Batteries Optional Lithium-Ion batteries provide standby power “off the grid” during emergencies. They last 10 times longer than traditional lead acid batteries. Lithium battery parts are recyclable.

Learning Objectives:

1. Designing the building enclosure to reduce demand 2. Designing a mechanical system to predict utility cost 3. Designing healthy indoor air technologies 4. Lithium-Ion batteries … the solution to “off grid living”

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Fewer Shades of Gray: HVAC Design in Rev. 08

Day 2 - 2:15 AM-3:15 AM

Presenters: Dean Gamble  Paul Wlodkowski 

Morning fog. Monorail silver. Tinsmith. Perhaps there are too many shades of gray, just like there used to be too many interpretations about how to comply with ENERGY STAR’s HVAC design requirements. With Revision 08, we’ve aimed to change that. In this session, we’ll cover key HVAC design policies that have been clarified and simplified. This will give partners greater confidence, lower the hassle factor, and reduce disputes about compliance. Plus, get a preview of another big improvement coming in 2016.

Learning Objectives:

• Discuss the key HVAC design policies that have been updated in Rev. 08 of ENERGY STAR • Recognize common areas confusion and conflict related to HVAC design requirements • List improvements coming in 2016 to the Rev. 08 HVAC design policies • Comply with ENERGY STAR’s HVAC design requirements

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Fire Sprinklers - The Ultimate Fire Fighters

Day 3 - 7:30 AM-8:30 AM

Presenter: Eric Skare 

The residential fire problem has changed over the last several decades. Although some aspects have improved, fires in newly constructed and furnished homes can become deadly in as little as a few minutes. This presentation will provide an overview of why residential fire sprinklers are so effective, and so necessary in today’s environment. New materials, design approaches, and applications will be highlighted to provide insight, awareness, and understanding of fire sprinkler systems. Learn how, and why, to incorporate this life saving technology into your cutting edge building designs.

Learning Objectives:

Dispel the myths and misconceptions with residential fire sprinkler systems. Understand why residential fires are so dangerous, especially in newly constructed and furnished homes. Identify new materials, technologies and advancements with resiential fire sprinkler systems. Highlight new applications for residential fire sprinklers.

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Fundamentals of a Healthier Home – Capitalizing on EPA’s Indoor airPLUS Label

Day 3 - 7:30 AM-8:30 AM

Presenters: Nick Hurst  Ross Britton 

Attend this session to hear tips and strategies from local Indoor airPLUS partners on how to build and sell improved IAQ with the Indoor airPLUS Program. We’ll discuss the basics of the Construction Specifications and what’s required to take the next step beyond energy efficiency. If you haven’t explored the Indoor airPLUS Program recently, you’ll find that with just a little up-front effort, you can easily be marketing the Indoor airPLUS label to homebuyers and offering improved comfort, safety, and a healthier home.

Learning Objectives:

Learn the fundamental construction techniques to improve indoor air quality (IAQ) in new homes. Learn how to easily find low-emission materials to meet the indoor airPLUS Construction Specifications. Explore EPA's free marketing resources to help you sell enhanced IAQ. Discover how Texas builders and Home Energy Raters are capitalizing on Indoor airPLUS in their market.

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Getting Cathedral Ceilings Right

Day 1 - 9:30 AM-10:30 AM

Presenter: Martin Holladay  

Every week, homeowners and builders pose the same question on the Green Building Advisor web site: “How can I fix my cathedral ceiling?” The reported symptoms vary; while some people complain of ice dams, others complain of high energy bills or temperature stratification problems. In this session, Martin Holladay will share photos of ceiling disasters and will explain how to get the details right.`

Learning Objectives:

• Understanding why so many cathedral ceiling fail • Understanding why a good ceiling air barrier matters more than ventilation above the insulation • Understanding code requirements for cathedral ceiling insulation • Understanding the best ways to fix failing cathedral ceilings and the best ways to build new cathedral ceilings

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Going Beyond Energy to "Double Zero"

Day 3 - 8:40 AM-9:40 AM

Presenters: Laureen Blissard  Bob Kreger 

While designing and building a certified Passive House is no small feat, imagine how challenging it would be if the home also had no potable water supply. This session will go in-depth into both the energy and water conservation features of a New Mexico home, currently under consideration, called the Double Zero Home.  Additionally, it will cover the use of the predictive modeling tool called WERS that was used to establish its water efficiency.

Learning Objectives:

1) Go beyond considering only energy and support the importance of water conservation, even in "water rich" states. 2) Identify key measurable interior and exterior building elements that affect energy and water use. 3) Estimate the measurable results of water consuming interior and exterior building elements using predictive and performance based modeling. 4) Recognize region appropriate energy and water conservation strategies through the presentation of the results of a specific case study. 5) Help convey the benefit of performance based water conservation to state and/or local jurisdictions/communities, and/or elected officials, in adopting water conservation measures.

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Green is Mainstream...What does that mean for the building industry?

Day 1 - 9:30 AM-10:30 AM

Presenter: Suzanne Shelton 

Green has made the shift from fringe idea to mainstream value—62% of Americans think of the word “green” as positive, and 69% consider the environmental record of a manufacturer when making product selection decisions. So there’s no need to shy away from talking directly about the environmental benefits of building products and green homes. This session will reveal market insights that should give builders and manufacturers comfort in putting green at the forefront of their marketing efforts, and the session will walk through real-world examples and tactics of how to do this most effectively.

Learning Objectives:

Understand consumer perceptions of “green” as it relates to the building industry Understand the importance of including sustainability at the forefront of their marketing efforts Learn how to apply specific messaging and marketing recommendations in their marketing efforts Gain insight into how green marketing is best applied in the building industry

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HERS Plus - A Vision for Builder-Rater Partnership

Day 1 - 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

Presenter: Steve Byers 

Today’s HERS Raters, if used properly can be a cost-effective enhancement to any builders quality control program. Taken to the next level, HERS Raters can do considerably more to help builders manage risk and improve quality. Find out what you may be missing today and what you could be getting tomorrow from your HERS Rater.

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High Performance Mechanicals for Houses That Work™

Day 2 - 8:00 AM-4:30 AM

Presenter: Gord Cooke 

High Performance Mechanical Systems for Houses That Work is a mid-level, full day seminar geared towards Builders, Designers, Code Officials, and Trade Allies that focuses on HVAC, Ventilation, Hot Water, Indoor Air Quality and Electronic Home Controls in high performance housing.  In the past several years, residential mechanical systems have grown in complexity and scope as energy codes have mandated higher insulation levels, better windows and tighter construction. There is now a great opportunity to rethink and redesign HVAC, hot water heating and electronic home control systems as they are major contributors to energy efficiency goals. This course will first review the key building science concepts that have changed the way houses are built and identify the relevant changes to mechanical systems. The remainder of the course will focus on the proper sizing and selection of appropriate mechanical equipment for high performance ever lower load homes. Compelling opportunities to simultaneously optimize comfort, durability, safety and health, efficiency and cost will be identified.  Instructor will use lectures, case studies and group exercises to convey the information to attendees.

Learning Objectives:

Gain an understanding of the basic building science concepts relevant to mechanical systems in high performance housing; Knowledge of the sizing adjustments, calculations and commissioning process for low load residential HVAC systems and how to choose the proper system for a specific climate zone; Understand the main causes of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) concerns and their mitigation, including the effect of the building envelope on the need for ventilation and strategies and types of ventilation systems, including new technologies; Recognize opportunities for a wide range of equipment for at least space heating, space cooling, water heating, indoor air quality and occupant control; • Comprehend the role of electronic controls systems with relation to mechanical equipment and achievable energy savings; learn how to choosing the right system and maximize integration with other equipment in the home;

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High Performance, Intelligent Homes... A Sanctuary to Thrive In

Day 2 - 9:15 AM-10:15 AM

Presenter: John Gillett 

Digital Technology has reached into every corner of our world, seemingly revolutionizing everything it touches. Strangely, homes seem to have been passed over by these digital gods. That’s not to say that technology doesn’t exist within homes, it just hasn’t been integrated into the very fabric of the home. The result is a home that operates like a bunch of separate components, all gathered up under a single roof, but not interacting to any great extent with each other, providing a marginal at best experience for the home occupants. The new home of today is hardly any different than the one that was built in 1947, the year the transistor was invented.

Learning Objectives:

Understand the underlying technologies that will be embedded into new homes. Learn ways that technology integrated into new homes today is changing the experience for home occupants. Imagine ways technology will enable a new wave of innovation within homes by enhancing and creating brand new experiences for the home occupants. Consider that this wave of innovation is upon us and that if we do not take charge of this change, companies from outside the industry, for exaple Silicon Valley, will displace those that cannot adapt.

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High Performance, Moisture Managed Envelope Systems for the Masses

Day 1 - 2:15 AM-3:15 AM

Presenter: Vladimir Kochkin 

Wall system design today is more challenging than ever. Performance expectations have changed. Materials and methods have changed. And cost competition is tougher than ever. Selecting a low-risk, moisture managed high performance wall system design today often involves consultation from expert building scientists. But, if high performance homes are going to be commonplace, we need a more scalable solution to get this expert knowledge into the hands of all industry professionals. Scientists from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and some of the world’s top experts on durable high performance wall system design are developing an online “expert system” tool that can help builders through moisture-managed high performance envelope design decisions. The tool will draw from Building America research projects, lab and field test measurements of high performance wall systems, computer aided risk analysis, and the expert judgment needed to make sense out of all the data. This session will introduce this tool, provide real-world examples of the research informing envelope best practices, and provide an opportunity for feedback.

Learning Objectives:

Understand key challenges associated with designing and Building high performance wall systems Discuss changes in the market, material and methods that impact wall performance Compare different methods to select low-risk, moisture managed high performance wall systems Recall the details on the Building America wall “expert system” being presented in the session, and real-world examples of the Research that is informing the development of this tool.

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Houses That Work - Full Day Building Science Session

Day 1 - 9:30 AM-10:30 AM

Presenters: Justin Wilson  Gord Cooke 

In this course participants learn how many complex changes in home design, building materials, mechanical systems, appliances, consumer lifestyles and expectations over the last 30 years makes every builder's, supplier's and trade contractor's job more complex and demanding. This course outlines the basic building science physics of air, heat and moisture flow that every builder should know so they can understand why some buildings work and others don't.

Learning Objectives:

Learn to use the science of houses to assist in the evaluation and specification of designs, building materials and methods. Identify the changes that have occurred in the way that we build and use houses and the risks to designers, homebuilders and others inthe industry these changes. Identify the fundamentals of building science and how builders can use science to solve a wide range of building problems, improve home performance and reduce risks. Practice using the language of building science to improve communication with suppliers, trade partners and home buyers

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HVAC Modeling Accuracy: If Only Homes Were Unoccupied

Day 1 - 10:45 AM-11:45 AM

Presenters: Chuck Booten  Joe Robertson 

Accurate building energy simulation is one of the most critical and enabling tools for improving performance in homes because it is the essential method for generalizing the impact and importance of experimental data to broader applications. Thermostat set point temperature assumptions are a key driver of predicted energy use, and yet appropriate assumptions regarding typical temperatures are elusive. Over the past several years, detailed home characteristics and indoor air temperature data were collected in 320 homes across many climate regions and were used to estimate home characteristics that have the most influence on indoor temperature. These characteristics were used to help guide the analysis of data from thousands of connected thermostats across the United States. It provided a much larger dataset, so more accurate temperature readings can obtained. This session will share and discuss results from this study.

Learning Objectives:

Understand the need for accurate Building energy simulation as the essential method for generalizing the impact and importance of experimental data to broader applications. Recall assumptions on thermostat set point temperature as a key driver of predicted energy use Discuss Research on home characteristics and indoor air temperature data used to estimate home characteristics that have the most influence on indoor temperature. Understand these characteristics and how they were used to help guide the analysis of data from thousands of connected thermostats across the United States.

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ICFs as an Integral Component of High Performance Homes

Day 1 - 10:45 AM-11:45 AM

Presenters: Michael Hanes  Kevin Davis 

High performance energy efficient construction starts with the envelope. Building with continuous concrete wall systems simplifies air and thermal barrier installation and coordination. Follow the step-by-step construction of Insulating Concrete Form (ICF) walls. Learn how these systems can enable homebuilders to meet increasingly stringent energy code requirements more easily by eliminating taping, sealing, modified framing, and sub-contractor coordination and quality control issues in the field. Through actual field examples and monitored case studies this session will cover: * an overview of the building science attributes of ICF exterior walls. * ICF and air tightness * The challenges of ICF construction and how to meet them * Overview of whole building design of ICF homes * Two performance levels will be explored - 1) ICF Basic 2) ICF Enhanced Performance * Case Studies and energy usage statistics

Learning Objectives:

1. Identify the elements of the ICF wall assembly that contribute to thermal performance. 2. Identify other building material components that can be added into the home design to enhance the thermal performance of ICF homes 3. Identify HVAC strategies that work best in High Performance ICF Homes. 4. Disclose actual energy performance results of High Performance ICF homes.

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Is the Cost of Efficiency Measures Making Homes Unaffordable?

Day 3 - 9:50 AM-10:50 AM

Presenter: Nehemiah Stone 

For several cycles of upgrades to building energy efficiency standards, builders’ associations have argued that the increasing stringency of the standards is negatively impacting housing affordability. This presentation will share the findings of utility-sponsored research by Stone Energy Associates and UCLA’s Anderson Forecast that dispels that argument. While construction costs may rise with increased code requirements, the pattern of increases and decreases in housing prices bears essentially no relationship to those cost increases.

Learning Objectives:

1. Gain an understanding of the nature of link between changes in the cost of construction and the price that developers get for their houses. 2. Learn what is affected by rising construction costs. 3. Learn what the sources of the larger cost increases are. 4. Come to understand that prices in the housing market are demand driven, not inputs driven.

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Issues, Challenges and Opportunities in Mandated Residential Mechanical Ventilation

Day 2 - 10:30 AM-11:30 AM

Presenters: Aaron Gary  Scott Sanders 

With the adoption of the 2015 ICC Codes, mechanical ventilation now becomes required for single-family homes and low-rise residential buildings.  This new reality creates both challenges and opportunities for designers, installers and code officials.  In this session, we delve into the applicable codes and standards that require mechanical ventilation, including where they overlap and where the requirements differ.  We will explain various ventilation strategies and technologies and show they can exacerbate or alleviate the challenges associated with the enforcement of these provisions.

Learning Objectives:

Understand the provisions of the ICC codes that govern mechanical ventilation in low rise residential buildings • Be able to evaluate options and strategies for complying with residential mechanical ventilation requirements • Be Familiar with emerging ventilation system technology • Develop confidence in plan examination and field inspection strategies of mechanical ventilation systems

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LEED Homes V4- A Provider's Perspective

Day 1 - 10:45 AM-11:45 AM

Presenter: Paul Gay 

All LEED for Homes projects registered after October 1, 2016 must certify under LEED v4. Come and learn program requirements and understand the basic differences from the original version and how it compares to 2015 IECC code and Energy Star V3 . Also hear about challenges and lessons learnt for both Single Family and Multi Family pathways.

Learning Objectives:

Understand the differences between LEED for Homes 2008 and LEED for Homes v4. • Identify the common obstacles and pathways to certification. • Understand how LEED for Homes V4 to other protocols • Be able to apply one Provider’s “Lesson learned” (i.e. is it right for you, if so/ if not…… what to do next) ?

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Major Changes in Texas Residential Energy Codes

Day 1 - 9:30 AM-10:30 AM

Presenter: Aaron Gary 

This session looks at the changes to Texas statutes affecting the building industry including the impact of the state's move from the 2009 to the 2015 energy code.   The 2009 IECC and 2015 IECC are compared through the requirements of the Prescriptive, Performance, and ERI paths.  ENERGY STAR, as a path of compliance in the State of Texas, is also reviewed.

Learning Objectives:

Be familiar with the Four Energy Code compilance paths allowed by the State of Texas. Understand how the individual Energy Code compliance paths have changed with the adoption of the 2015 IECC. Understand the biggest challenges these changes present to the building trades. Capture some ideas of how to help builders and trades adjust to these challenges.

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Meeting the Challenges of Emerging Air-Tightness Requirements

Day 2 - 3:30 PM-4:30 PM

Presenter: James Rinne 

Many states are adopting higher standards for the air-tightness of new homes. These emerging codes necessitate that builders and trades better understand the underlying causes of air-leakage, and will require most to make significant adjustments to their building practice/process. Drawing on insights made in both the laboratory and the real world, this presentation will review many of the common sources of air-infiltration, and highlight practical strategies for cost effectively addressing these issues in order to meet emerging air-tightness requirements.

Learning Objectives:

• Understand the underlying causes of air-leakage. • Identify critical air-leakage pathways. • Highlight the need for ongoing education and change management. • Learn strategies for meeting emerging air-infiltration requirements.

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Moisture Science 101 - It's Not the Heat, It's the Humidity!

Day 1 - 10:45 AM-11:45 AM

Presenter: Dan Welklin 

Moisture Science 101 is mandatory for every person involved in designing and installing home comfort systems, especially if you intend to ventilate as required. In a single class, “moisture load” will finally make sense to you (and somehow Dan gets through it without the Psychrometric naptime). Before you can control moisture, you have to understand it. Maybe ventilation is the key to moisture control? Maybe, but before you attend the ventilation class and before you can hope to follow the ongoing discussions about ventilation, you must thoroughly understand how infiltration, ventilation, AC latent capacities and AC run time affects the moisture and comfort in a home. Attend Dan’s class and see why some homes fail to reach full comfort, despite all the energy codes and high-tech devices.

Learning Objectives:

• Learn how much moisture is really in that fresh air. • Learn how our past reliance on air conditioners to control moisture is now failing us. • Learn why a residential load calculation does tell the whole story. • Learn at least one strategy to control indoor humidity and perhaps change your business.

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Multi-Family Certifications: Learning the Hard Way

Day 2 - 10:30 AM-11:30 AM

Presenter: Laureen Blissard 

But, we are on the verge of a revolution in new homes. With the rapid advancement of sensor technology, coupled with maturing, low power, wireless standards, we can now envision a home that is highly responsive to the environment around it and is able to be controlled by its occupants in a way that optimizes their experience. In an experience that will account for health, comfort, enjoyment and productivity, among other things.

Learning Objectives:

1) Understand the current drivers for multi-family certifications 2) Evaluate the nuances for specific multi-family certifications 3) Identify opportunities for business model expansion as well as potential liabilities 4) Apply specialized field documentation techniques

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Multifamily Affordable Housing that is Healthy, Efficient, Cost Effective and LEED Platinum

Day 2 - 9:15 AM-10:15 AM

Presenter: Sharon Grant 

With experience on a dozen multifamily affordable housing projects that have achieved LEED Platinum certification and HERS scores in the 40’s, Sharon Grant, LEED AP, HHS and CSBA, will share insight on best practices, lessons learned and strategies that result in resident, owner and project team satisfaction.  Sharon has collected feedback on what works, what doesn’t and what matters most: from low energy bills to living in a healthy home and not having asthma attacks.  These projects debunk the assumptions that energy efficiency adds too much cost or that green homes are only for the wealthy.

Learning Objectives:

Analyze the strategies used to achieve low energy costs, HERS scores in the 40's and long term value. Identify approaches to build healthy housing that residents appreciate and desire. Evaluate the lessons learned, challenges and preferences for subs and projectt teams. Discuss the potential next steps for multifamily affordable housing to take it to the next level.

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New Option to Compliance to Energy Codes: The Energy Rating Index and HERS Raters and the Performance Option of the IECC

Day 3 - 8:40 AM-9:40 AM

Presenters: Matt Gingrich  Clayton Traylor  Shawna Cuan 

Performance compliance options to the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) are becoming increasing compliance option for home builders. Performance compliance sets a target and allows the builder the flexibility to choose how to meet the targets. There are now two performance options in the IECC: Performance Option and the Energy Rating Index Option. Ten states have already adopted the Energy Rating Index Option. This session will feature a homebuilder, state energy office representative and a HERS rating company to describe how the Energy Rating Index was adopted in Illinois, Michigan, Texas and Utah and the benefits of compliance option to the energy code.

Learning Objectives:

Understanding of the performance compliance option to energy codes • Understand how the Energy Rating Index has been adopted in four states • Understand the opportunities of performance compliance has to HERS Raters * Understand the opportunities of performance compliance for home builders

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Realtors: The Client You've Never Called On

Day 1 - 2:15 AM-3:15 AM

Presenter: Todd Gamboa 

Realtors represent buyers in over 90% of new home transactions. So why do they know so little about codes, construction, the building process, and high performance homes? Get Realtors past the granite countertops and get them into the mechanical room by teaching them how to become New Home Specialist Realtors. Convert a customer and you create a great contract, ... Convert a Realtor and you create 10 great contracts!

Learning Objectives:

1. Understand the role of real estate professionals in the new home buying process 2. Demonstrate the key points that Realtors can use to differentiate resale, code, and high performance homes. 3. Builders, contractors and HERS Raters will learn to generate additional business leveraging Realtors influence, marketing, and education. 4. Energy /Performance programs will learn how to incorporate Realtors and education to improve participation, meet goals, and transform markets.

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Remember the Jetsons? Your Home of the Future Today

Day 2 - 10:30 AM-11:30 AM

Presenter: Marla Esser 

Today, we will discuss the first steps that we are taking to usher in this revolution, listening to some of the pioneers in this new high performance, intelligent home era. You will learn about technologies that are being employed in homes already, approaches to further integrate key components of the homes building envelope and new ideas for using technology to build upon the experience of the new home occupant.

Learning Objectives:

Learn what a Home of the Future is today. Learn how a Home of the Future Today is part of a green home. Learn why a Home of the Future Today offers convenience, safety and fun for today's home buyer and owner. Learn how to create a Home of the Future today.

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Residential HVAC Systems and Strategies: Line of Sight and Horizons

Day 2 - 9:15 AM-10:15 AM

Presenter: Tim Beggs 

Homeowners are demanding better performance from today's homes, particularly in the areas of energy savings, thermal comfort, and healthy environments. In this session you will learn how the residenential systems market is eveolving in response to performance expectations, and which HVAC systems and strategies can help deliver high performance.  IBACOS will report on today's state-of-the-art HVAC solutions that respond to market changes, and will provide insight into what's next in terms of efficient and effective residentential HVAC based upon the latest in residential HVAC research and product development.

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Searching “4” the ACH Solution

Day 2 - 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

Presenters: Steve Saunders  Phil Crone 

The Texas Legislature's adoption of the 2015 energy code created a unique challenge for Dallas-Fort Worth; move the nation's largest housing market to 3 air changes per hour or find a flexible approach without compromising performance. Learn how diverse stakeholders arrived at an innovative solution just in the nick of time.

Learning Objectives:

• Receive an overview on the Texas regulatory framework for energy code adoption and implementation. • Learn the unique challenges legislative adoption of the 2015 energy code imposed on the Dallas-Fort Worth housing market. • Understand the viewpoints of and negotiations between various stakeholders including home energy raters, energy efficiency proponents, home builders, and regulatory agencies. • Discover the innovative solution that stakeholders unanimously supported and how it may be a model for other jurisdictions.

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Success with ENERGY STAR HVAC Revision 08 Requirements: Increasing your Company's Bottom Line

Day 2 - 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

Presenters: Aaron Holden  Cody McGhie 

The ENERGY STAR standards have changed for all new homes permitted after July 1, 2016 to comply with the Revision 08 requirements and checklists. Reading these standards is one thing, implementing them can be a beast. (And in some locations the 2012 and 2015 IECC code requirements overlap!) Want to learn how to make more impact by being more efficient, effective and economical? With the various efforts used to comply with the ENERGY STAR HVAC requirements, what approaches have worked, what have been hurdles and what have been utter failures. The HVAC related program requirements are shared between the HVAC Design Report, the HVAC Commissioning Checklist and the Rater Checklists. These items will not only be discussed from a house as a system approach, but also from a business as a system approach to minimize the surprises during the construction process. Discussions will be mainly technical in nature, but also the order of operations and communication streams will be discussed to promote a smooth flow between designers, installers and commissioning professionals. During this session we will be sharing common hurdles and details to maximize the HVAC system design, installation and commissioning. This will come in the form of visual slides, shared historical data, and guided conversations with program checklists and audience experience. Who should attend: Owners, Co-owners, Operation Managers, and Commissioning Professionals

Learning Objectives:

1) Make participants aware of HVAC requirements on the ENERGY STAR Design Report, HVAC Commissioning Checklist and the Rater Checklists. 2) Share successful tools and materials available for optimal inputs and outputs for ENERGY STAR requirements. 3) Share common hurdles and challenges found in previously submitted HVAC checklists. 4) Provide participants with examples on ways to align program HVAC requirements with typical construction schedules and contractor interaction

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System Perfomance of Heat Pump Hot Water Heaters

Day 3 - 9:50 AM-10:50 AM

Presenter: Andrew Lau 

Heat pump water heaters (HPWH) have the potential to save up to two-thirds of the electricity used to heat domestic hot water, if considered in isolation operating at typical room temperature. However, because they are located in the house, the heat that they pump into the hot water is not 100% free, particularly in the heating season. If located in the conditioned space, the heat they extract from the space in the heating season is provided by the house space heating system and/or other sources of heat like appliances. This generally reduces the overall electricity savings from the HPWH, and in the case of electric resistance space heat, a HPWH will save little during the heating season. In the cooling season, there is always some air conditioning benefit of a HPWH. If located in an unconditioned space like a basement, the overall electricity savings depends on the basement heat transfer characteristics and especially the amount of insulation in the basement ceiling. In general, a HPWH in an unconditioned space will lower the space temperature. This lowers the operating efficiency of the HPWH while also drawing some additional heat from the space above. This paper reports on a study of these factors, and an estimation of the various possible net effects on electricity use compared with a conventional electric resistance water heater. For a HPWH with a COP of 2.9 at 70 oF located in conditioned space, the heating season average COP in northern climates ranges from 1 when the space is conditioned with electric resistance heat, to about 1.5 when conditioned with an air-to-air heat pump. For a HPWH in an unconditioned basement, heating season COP ranges from about 1.2 to 1.9 depending on the basement heat transfer characteristics. Considering the overall system performance in choosing and placing a HPWH in a house is the take-away message of this study.

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Taking the Performance Path - The Energy Rating Index (ERI) for Builders & Designers

Day 3 - 7:30 AM-8:30 AM

Presenter: Steve Herzlieb 

This full day session reviews Building Science principles as they relate to the Performance Path option in the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC).  The course explores the ERI/HERS as a tool to successfully design and build houses that comply using the Performance Path option, while meeting the minimum prescriptive code requirements of the 2015 IECC. Participants will spend the last part of the session reviewing energy rating software and manipulating construction assemblies to see the effect of energy scores.

Learning Objectives:

Understand basic building science terminology and principles as they relate to the International Energy Code Comprehend the methods used in calculating and Energy Rating Index. Understand the implications of different climate zones and building assemblies on the Energy Rating Index. Attain a working understanding of the major approved energy rating software packages used in calculating an energy rating.

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The Benefits of Building Smart: Connected Home Products for High Performance Homes

Day 2 - 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

Presenter: Emily Kemper 

Builders and contractors present a cost-effective avenue for the installation of smart home products in new construction, and an ideal channel for implementation of energy saving strategies via efficiency programs.  This presentation will address the potential advantages to builders and trade allies in leveraging smart home products, including the opportunity for builders to incorporate state-of-the-art appliances and devices that are both energy efficient and connected via a command center model; the ability to better manage incremental equipment costs; the best strategies for customer education and engagement; and paths to net-zero ready homes. Ultimately, new smart home platforms could give homeowners more options for comfort and security while providing more insight into and control over how they use energy.

Learning Objectives:

• Identify appropriate connected or smart home devices to include in the development of new and retrofitting of existing homes • Identify which energy end-uses and systems in the home are the most appropriate for incorporating smart home technology • Determine which categories of devices can save energy, improve comfort, and offer security functions to homeowners, in addition to other benefits • Learn about installation best practices and customer engagement techniques that, when paired with connected devices, will increase homeowner satisfaction

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The Connected Home is a Healthy Home

Day 2 - 3:30 AM-4:30 AM

Presenter: Brandon Glancy 

An in depth look at the importance of including automated HVAC and Indoor Air Quality in today’s homes. Automated HVAC in the new home sector provides the opportunity for today’s builders to meet the growing demand for healthier environments with proper control of temperature, humidity, air purity, fresh air ventilation. Learn how today’s advanced HVAC and control systems provide a cleaner, healthier, more comfortable and energy efficient home environment.

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The Path to Net Zero Goes Right Through Hydronicsville

Day 2 - 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

Presenter: Mark Eatherton 

Mean Radiant Temperature is the primary factor in assuring human comfort within any given space, and there is only one correct way to control it on either end of the comfort scale (heating or cooling) As buildings become more efficient, the use of radiant floor heating systems make less and less sense, and we can show you why. Hydronic heating and cooling systems have been proven over their 100 plus year history, and we can show you cost effective means of attaining Net Zero using these proven methodologies.

Learning Objectives:

What is Mean Radiant Temperature, and Operative Temperature, and how do they affect human comfort. How can we manipulate the Mean Radiant Temperature using state of the art hydronics and assure excellent occupant comfort? Why radiant ceilings in a HP structure make more sense than do radiant floors. How to achieve cost effective net zero utilizing off shelf hydronic technology.

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The Seven Secrets of How Nature Designs: Applying the Lessons of Biomimicry to Your Business

Day 3 - 8:40 AM-9:40 AM

Presenter: Eric Corey-Freed 

Twenty years ago, no one would have believed that any company without a website would not be in business in the future. Today, you may not believe that any company not taking charge of their environmental footprint or their approach to sustainability will also not be in business. In this talk, you'll discover how the threat of climate change is already affecting your business. You'll uncover how to take a leadership position in your industry by leveraging the challenges of environmental responsibility, you'll motivate your operations team to uncover new opportunities, inspire your sales group to upsell new services, or tap into your lifecycle to uncover new product lines. Instead of being a depressing talk on the environment, this hilarious talk will inspire you and transform how you look at your business. This brand new talk is "bullet-point free" (no boring, text heavy slides used). Using rich graphics and video, this presentation will expand your imagination and and provide you a list of actions to take into your own projects. Presented by the acclaimed speaker, architect and author of "Green Building for Dummies."

Learning Objectives:

* how to reduce the future liability and risks of climate change to lower operational costs and increase product profitability * examine the lifecycle of your products to uncover ways to increase profit margins and lower costs * learn how to explain your environmental mission statement to your customers to engage them and attract new ones * how to set a “Mission Zero” for your company and use it to transform how you do business

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The Times, They Are A-Changin’: Keeping Current With Building Science

Day 1 - 9:30 AM-10:30 AM

Presenters: Sam Rashkin  Michael Baechler  Eric Werling 

Codes are changing. Materials are changing. Houses are getting tighter. Consumers are getting more educated, and more demanding. At Building America, our work is focused on researching and developing solutions to advance the market for high performance homes. Our solutions are designed to help builders succeed in the changing market. Our research projects result in tried-and-true technical and business solutions that can help builders weather changes and deliver high performance homes. In this session, we will discuss progress on Building America’s Research-to-Market Plan and associated Technology-to-Market Roadmaps, walk through all of the new and cool projects being undertaken by the labs and our industry teams, and highlight Building America resources that that can be used today.

Learning Objectives:

Understand how codes, materials, and market dynamics are changing in the residential market and how they apply to high performance homes. Identify key attributes of the Research-to-market Plan and associated Technology-to-market Roadmaps List projects being undertaken by Building America teams to advance high performance homes Summarize technical resources available from the Building America program, and Building America Solution Center.

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The Valuation of High Performance Homes

Day 1 - 10:45 AM-11:45 AM

Presenter: Debra Little 

The challenges of ICF construction and how to meet them

Learning Objectives:

1. Accurate recognition of full market value is a team effort accomplished by home owners/builders, home performance and real estate pros working together. 2. Participants don’t have to be victims of inadequate appraisals by untrained appraisers but are empowered to demand competency and to support transparency with documentation. Same goes for RE agents; in both selling and buying, accurate representation of high performance assets is your right and responsibility. 3. Beyond energy benefits contribution to value has yet to be reconciled in the residential sector. The cases for durability, comfort and the ‘health/IAQ condition’ will be addressed as attendees engage in discussion around how these assets might be calculated to be realized as contributors to market value. 4. Data and emerging technology to facilitate its collection and accessibility will be a market driver. This train is chugging on out of the station.

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The Wall Section - What Does it all Mean?

Day 1 - 9:30 AM-10:30 AM

Presenter: Steven Baczek 

We look at wall sections all the time – but what do all the lines mean. Get a better understanding of how all the materials in a wall section synthesize to develop the systems needed for a successful building. Understand the relationships of water management, thermal management, vapor management, and air leakage thru the use of real world wall sections used in building high performance homes.

Learning Objectives:

1. Learn to read wall sections from a “systems approach”. 2. Learn the relationships of thermal, vapor, and water management in wall sections. 3. Learn to develop the “continuous red line” that is the air barrier thru the use of the wall section. 4. Learn to develop wall systems in a proportional manner to be the most cost effective approach to the situation

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To Boldly Go Where No One Has Gone Before: An Exploration of Thermal Comfort

Day 2 - 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

Presenter: Achilles Karagiozis 

Just as Americans are increasingly conscientious about preventing wasted resources in their personal lives, the energy efficiency and conservation is also steadily improving in buildings. Current building codes have become more stringent requiring higher insulation levels and better equipment efficiencies, among other benchmarks, to help reduce energy use. In addition to the rising attention on reducing energy use, Americans are also interested in increasing the comfort in these buildings. This represents the next frontier of building better. Yet, buildings across the United States that have been built with the design principles of comfort represent a small minority. Arguably a critical component in homeowner satisfaction and home value, occupant comfort can get overlooked in today’s code-driven building practices targeting energy efficiency. In fact, ASHRAE has been working on this issue for several decades and has developed the ASHRAE standard 55 on Thermal Comfort. As part of understanding the role of comfort as a key metric for overall building performance, this session will explain the ASHRAE standard and provide examples of how today’s building professionals can improve the thermal comfort of residential buildings in a number of climate zones. Specifically, this presentation will explore new building techniques and identify solutions that enhance the comfort, durability and energy efficiency of the high performance homes you are building. This session will also showcase success stories that will inspire builders to think differently about how you build. As part of understanding the role of comfort as a key metric for overall building performance, this session will conduct a building science and technology driven examination of comfort through the application of comfort analysis, builder insights, advanced software tools and modeling to bring actionable expertise and instruction forward to attendees. This presentation will also pair the physics involved in hygrothermal transport and principles of building-science driven to share fresh insights and actionable expertise to help the audience achieve comfortably built homes. Specifically, attendees will learn how technology like WUFIPlus® can remove the guesswork from the design equation and reinvent the way building professionals can approach building design for comfort and long-term durability. Real world examples will highlight how this hygrothermal analysis tool normalizes variables including climate, material properties, construction and boundary conditions and accurately accounts for correct interior loads of occupant heat and moisture in a new construction home. At the conclusion of this session, attendees will learn how building scientists can integrate thermal comfort in the basic building design regardless of climate zone to help differentiate themselves and build better homes.

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Transitioning from Building to Code to Building High Performance Homes

Day 1 - 2:15 AM-3:15 AM

Presenter: Jake Bruton 

With many different factors going into each client's project, energy efficiency and durability are always a discussion. When talking with subs, suppliers, crewmen and architects those conversations can be difficult. Persuasive arguments toward the future of green building need to be had to create change. Difficulty comes in an industry that has 250,000 different contractors to convince. Thankfully you only have to convince those involved in your projects. What methods should be used to convince these others to follow the energy path? What arguments have been successful for other builders? Where do you turn to find resources to back up the ideas your firm is pushing?

Learning Objectives:

How one builder is creating change with his sub contractors, suppliers and architects. How one builder is creating change within his customer base. What resources have helped in this transition. Specific language that has helped with the transition into the energy efficient market.

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Under Pressure: Understanding & Using Static Pressure

Day 2 - 3:30 AM-4:30 AM

Presenters: Dean Gamble  Ted Konechne 

Pressure pushing air in ducts, pressing down and through, no design asked for..” Less entertaining, but more educational, than the classic song, this session will explain why static pressure is key to understanding HVAC systems. A live demo will show you what it is, where and how to measure it, and why it’s so valuable for assessing design and installation. Plus, you’ll understand how it intersects with the ENERGY STAR program and why it might become important for all HERS ratings in the years ahead.

Learning Objectives:

• Explain why static pressure is key to successful HVAC system design • Recognize where static pressure occurs and how to measure it • Understand how static pressure intersects with ENERGY STAR requirements • Understand how static pressure will become important for HERS ratings in the coming years.

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Update to the RESNET Water Efficiency Rating Index

Day 3 - 9:50 AM-10:50 AM

Presenter: Steve Baden 

Homebuilders, raters, and utilities currently lack a system for providing a numeric rating for the water efficiency of a whole building analogous to the HERS system for rating the energy efficiency of new and existing homes. An analogous numeric index for water efficiency would have great utility, not only goal-setting for new construction, but also for disclosure to purchasers of existing homes and for measuring the efficacy of water-saving retrofits in existing buildings, opening this challenging field to performance contracting on a large scale. It can also educate building owners about how water efficient their current home is and identify specific actions they can take to improve their score. Many water districts and utilities would welcome a credible and verifiable method for rating the water efficiency of homes. Accordingly, RESNET is in collaboration with NRDC and EPA WaterSense, announced the development of the RESNET Water Efficiency Rating Index. We anticipate that the performance of the following systems, fixtures, and fittings would be captured in the Index: • Indoor: toilets, showers (including multiple showerheads serving the same shower compartment), faucets (kitchen, sink and bathroom), clothes washers, dishwashers, evaporative coolers, whole house humidifiers, domestic water pipe sizing and layout, water softeners, water heaters. • Outdoor: irrigation (including the extent of turf grass and green infrastructure, as well as irrigation controllers and sensors) and decorative features, such as swimming pools and fountains. • Both Indoor and Outdoor: metering, pressure regulation, leak detection, rainwater catchment and graywater systems. It is the goal of RESNET and the International Code Council to adopt an ANSI consensus standard on the rating of a home's water efficiency. RESNET has created technical subcommittees to develop these protocols, (Modeling and Reference Home, Indoor Water Use and Outdoor Water Use). This session will provide an update on the progress of the technical subcommittees in developing these protocols and what are the issues involved with developing the RESNET WER Index calculations. Speakers will include Steve Baden, Executive Director of RESNET and Ed Osann, Senior Policy Analyst, Natural Resources Defense Council, Jonah Schein, EPA WaterSense.

Learning Objectives:

1. RESNET Update and Overview 2. Update on ERI nationally and, in particular, the ERI as part of the Texas energy code 3. Update on the RESNET Water Efficiency Rating Index 4. Rater panel: How a builder-Rater partnership can help builders to proactively avoid problems

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Viral Education and Outreach Efforts in the South-Central Region

Day 1 - 2:15 AM-3:15 AM

Presenters: Jason Vandever  Gerald Bodin  Johnathan Killebrew  Greg Clark 

SPEER’s Energy Code Ambassador Program supports 32 Ambassadors to provide local peer to peer assistance to building industry partners. Their advanced training in codes and communication network supports their efforts in the field. Hear from Ambassadors about just how they engage with their peers, and what impacts have been achieved through this volunteer corps. They will discuss ways they collaborate with local jurisdictions, builders, raters, and code officials to increase understanding and adoption of and compliance with the International Energy Conservation Code.

Learning Objectives:

1. Understand how Ambassadors increase builder's understanding of and compliance with the International Energy Conservation Code 2. Identify various strategies for aligning smaller jurisdictions with code adoption and enforcement enabling increased participation and compliance 3. Learn how the Ambassador Network encourages volunteers to advocate to local governments for advancing compliance with energy codes and proven methods to get involved with government in support of energy efficiency 4. Discover how an Ambassador Network supports the Commercial Energy Code in rural areas, Commercial Energy Code challenges and tools for increasing compliance

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Virtual QA- Timely Feedback in a Long Distance Partnership

Day 2 - 2:15 AM-3:15 AM

Presenter: Aaron Gary 

Access to homes is an issue that impedes on meeting the intent of the RESNET QA Standards.  Changes to the RESNET Quality Assurance Standards, which require that QA be carried out by a third-party external to the Rating Quality Assurance Provider, may compound the issue.  Come learn about a new virtual QA protocol that has the potential to strengthen any quality assurance program, making it more efficient, cost effective, easier to accommodate geographic distances, and provide timely feedback.

Learning Objectives:

• Understand how Virtual QA is applied in the RESNET Standards • Be able to identify the advantages of Virtual QA • Understand how to implement a Virtual QA session in the field • Be aware of other applications of Virtual QA for any quality assurance program

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Water Efficiency in Multifamily Buildings : Lessons Learned

Day 2 - 3:30 AM-4:30 AM

Presenter: Gary Klein 

The multifamily sector is critical to housing in the United States. There are many categories: low-rise, high-rise, market rate, affordable, seniors, active adults, and the general population. Water use in each type varies depending on the category. This session will ask and answer these and other questions: What are the major components of water use in multifamily buildings? What are the specifics within indoor, outdoor, advanced systems, hot and cold? What are the strategies for addressing water use efficiency in each of these components? How do these strategies vary depending on whether tenants are responsible for their own utilities? What can be done in existing buildings compared to new construction?

Learning Objectives:

1. Understand the magnitude and variation of water use patterns in multifamily buildings 2. Learn how to quickly assess the water efficiency opportunities components within each component of water use 3. Evaluate the water efficiency opportunities of different types of multifamily hot water systems 4. Learn hot to delivery hot water within 15 seconds, everywhere in any dwelling, every time they open a tap, in an energy efficient way. 5. Develop a list of best practices for water efficient design and installation that can be implemented in upcoming projects.

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What's RESNET Been Up to and Where is it Headed

Day 3 - 7:30 AM-8:30 AM

Presenters: Steve Baden  Kathy Spigarelli 

RESNET has been busy the past year with a number of initiatives that are important to the home building industry and the HERS Raters that work closely with home builders. This session will provide an overview of these initiatives including the development and release of new marketing tools for the HERS Index, FACT Sheets that help to support adoption of the new Energy Rating Index (ERI) in the IECC 2015, and another initiative to update and enhance how RESNET conducts quality assurance of the rating industry.

Learning Objectives:

• Update home builders and Raters on the latest information about RESNET initiatives • Know where to find additional information about the HERS Index, the ERI in the IECC 2015 • Know how to take advantage of opportunities created by RESNET’s initiatives * Learn where to find more information about RESNET and RESNET's initiatives

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Who Knew Zero Was so Simple: The Easy Lift from ENERGY STAR and Low HERS Index Scores

Day 2 - 10:30 AM-11:30 AM

Presenter: James Lyons 

Nearly 85,000 homes were ENERGY STAR certified in 2015. Over 195,000 homes were HERS rated in 2015 with an average HERS Index Score of 62. Based on these numbers, DOE estimates that 100,000 homes could easily make the leap to Zero Energy Ready Home with simple enhancements to their specifications. This session will show the proven innovations that make it easy for these builders to dramatically increase their recognition and risk reduction by moving up to Zero Energy Ready Home.

Learning Objectives:

• Identify specific enhancements to building specifications that can enable a Zero Energy Ready Home performance goal • List ways to improve builder recognition through Zero Energy Ready Home performance levels • Compare different risk reduction methods that can be achieved through improved performance and energy efficiency • Understand proven innovations that can reduce risk and increase brand recognition associated with ZERH.

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Why Smart Home Tech Will Revolutionize the Green Building Industry

Day 2 - 8:00 AM-9:00 AM

Presenter: Suzanne Shelton 

The people have spoken: smart home technology IS the linchpin for finally engaging consumers into green building – and you ready to leverage that new reality? This session will cover the latest research around consumer interest in smart home technology and sustainability, including what they’ve purchased, how satisfied they are, what their barriers are to buying, and their gut reactions to the technology as well as what we think is the real barrier to mass market adoption.

Learning Objectives:

Understand the market perception realities and opportunities that must be addressed to engage Americans in making greener home and building choices  Learn how to best address those perceptions and engage the market Apply specific messaging and marketing recommendations in their own marketing efforts Know how to bridge the gap between the smart home space and green buildings

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Window Installation 2.0

Day 1 - 2:15 AM-3:15 AM

Presenters: Stephen Fisher  Eric Klein 

Window installation as defined in ASTM E2112 has been revolutionary for the building industry - but it can be improved upon. This presentation is about the next steps beyond ASTM E2112 – Window Installation version 2.0. Anchoring, multiple units, and mulls are needed for structural requirements. Water management improvements that can be made to ASTM E2112; sloped sill, metal head and sill panning, rain skirt at sill, and extended compatibility discussion. Other topics to include; critical origami corner flashing folds and B-type installation using VF flash for moldings and casings. Window installation 2.0 will be demonstrated with a simplified 6 step process.

Learning Objectives:

1. Be able to list the 6 basic installation steps that should be used in many exposure applications (15 min) 2. Recognize the complication that can arise from combined water and structural requirements and understand several work-around solutions (5 min) 3. Understand and see the value in new water management details beyond ASTM E2112 (10 min); • Sloped sill, • Metal head flash or drip • Rain skirt • Critical origami corner folds • B-type with VF flash and casings 4. Understand and be able to complete several material compatibility checks on the job site (10 min)

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Zero Doesn't Have to Cost More: How Three Zero Energy Ready Home Builders Win on Value

Every time we present Zero Energy Ready Home to builders, the question that always comes up is how much does it cost. Our pat answer is that we have a detailed cost analysis that shows a cost premium ranging from approximately $5,500 to $8,500 depending on climate zone. However, we go on to say forget our study and look at the amazing cost competitive Zero Energy Ready Homes by a growing number of builders across the country and ask yourself what they have learned that you haven’t. At this session, you’ll learn from three Housing Innovation Award winning builders their solutions for competing on cost.

Learning Objectives:

Recall the approximate cost analysis for Zero Energy Ready Homes • Compare actual cost expectations with expected costs • Understand cost trade-offs for ZERH • Discuss solutions for competing on projects from a cost standpoint while pursuing Zero Energy Ready home goals

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zHome: Setting a Proven Net Zero Energy Precedent

Day 1 - 1:00 PM-2:00 PM

Presenter: Aaron Adelstein 

Completed in 2009, zHome was the first net zero energy townhome complex in the United States, launched to spur the market toward deep green housing for the average person. One of the primary project benchmarks was net zero energy use – a goal that is often modeled without any examination of the actual energy use post-occupancy. Learn about zHome’s performance, both modeled and actual, lessons learned from construction and analysis, and how others can replicate these deep green successes.

Learning Objectives:

How zHome performed in post-occupancy energy analysis The importance of post-occupancy analysis How to prepare for and conduct such analyses The importance of homeowner engagement in post-occupancy studies

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Zoning - The Challenges and the Opportunities

Day 2 - 3:30 AM-4:30 AM

Presenter: Michelle Cote 

You will look at ZONING on a whole new level when you participate in this session, and walk away feeling warm and fuzzy about the overall benefits of a right-sized system integrated into an “HVAC in a BOX” approach that delivers a WIN-WIN-WIN for the designers, builders, and homeowners.  

Learning Objectives:

Re-cap of the HVAC Challenges builders are facing today while striving for better, faster and cost efficient building practices. For builders not only trying to meet increased energy efficiency requirements in building codes, but also, for those targeting higher performance homes. Explore the challenges with traditional zoning systems, and the reasons that made them unattainable technology for smaller square footage and multi-residential products, where many challenges will continue to rise. Discover the benefits of a right-sized system featuring modulation through smart controls – the first step in delivering better comfort, lower noise, and energy management while driving cost efficiencies. With this winning formula, builders and designers will be walked through zoned system(s) that solve the challenges of traditional zoning while being economical, providing superior heating and cooling performance to all areas of the house and that is user friendly.

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